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Improving Organizational Effectiveness in Turbulent Times

Volume 2 Issue 11  Article by Dr. Derrick L. Campbell, Ed.D.                   June, 2010

During these turbulent times managers must utilize effective strategies that will transform their organization.

Managers can increase organizational effectiveness by involving employees in the decision making process.

Many managers develop vision and mission statements to only find that the company falls short of meeting the correlated goals and objectives.

Managers who use this type of leadership style assume that they have the right ideas and then use their authority to ensure organizational change without considering that mid and lower level positions will create ways to undermine and overthrow the organization change efforts.

Managers cannot get people to do things by force or coercion. This type of approach does not give the employee the benefit of solving problems that increase organizational effectiveness or problems which indicate employee incompetence. When employees see problems as an indication of their incompetence they create defenses that prevent increasing organizational effectiveness.

Managers must first develop trust with employees. If there is a trust gap, then the manager who is advocating the change will have a reduction in credibility.

Managers who desire to facilitate organizational change can develop trust and credibility with employees by providing essential information.

The information must include an organizational analysis as well as interviews with specifically targeted employees. The interviews must be coded and the manager must not reveal the identity of the interviewed employees.

After the initial trust building process the manager must co-create a shared vision with the employees. When a manager uses a co-creation process the manager conveys to the employees that they are important, valued, and respected. Also, managers who develop a shared vision with employees create a trusting collective unit between the manager and the employees.

Managers who chose not to use a trust building process with employees run the risk of developing and maintaining a dysfunctional organization which will result in declining overall production.

Finally, use a pilot group when initializing the organizational transformation. A pilot group will provide an incubator for the development of new ideas that will transform the organization in the desired direction.

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