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Volume 3 Issue 6

Eliminate Domestic Violence by Reducing Marital Conflict

January 1, 2011

 

 

Reflective process can eliminate domestic violence by reducing marital conflict between the husband and wife.

Before husbands and wives decide to wed they are exposed to various experiences in life which formulate their individual values. For example, boys and girls are exposed to either different values or expectations for men and women or one sided values and expectations. One sided value development can results from the influence of having only one parent in the household.

In many cases it is these differences in values that formulate the foundation for marital conflict. Martial conflict is a normal part of marriage. It is how we respond to marital conflict that presents the bigger challenge. Persons who respond to marital conflict by not resolving the root cause of the conflict can have a build up of bitterness, hatred, and anger which can lead to continued quarreling, uncontrolled anger, divorce, violence, and abuse.

Marital conflict that results in violence and abuse is often considered domestic violence. Domestic violence has many forms including physical aggression, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, controlling, intimidation, neglect, and economic deprivation. The cycle for domestic violence acts involves anticipation, coping, and then recovering from the acts.

Since the cycle of domestic violence is precluded by how individuals respond to conflict reflective practice can assist the potential abuser and victim by developing positive coping skills for marital conflict.

Husbands and wives can use the following process as a coping skill for marital conflict: After the husband and wife have had their disagreement or argument the husband and wife should retreat to a quite place. Using a piece of paper, draw a line down the middle of the paper. On the right side of the paper write down what was said by the husband and the wife. You may need more than one piece of paper to complete this coping strategy. On the left side write down what you were thinking about when you said something and when your spouse responded. Now look on the left side and determine when you had the opportunity to respond in a fashion that would have kept the dialogue positive.

After using this coping strategy on several occasions you will redevelop a thought process that ensures that any difficult or distressful communication with your spouse will remain positive and therefore avoid the pitfalls associated with divorce, violence, and abuse. 

 
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